Libretto: Pelléas et Mélisande

von Claude Debussy


Cast

MELISANDE (soprano)
PELLEAS (tenor)
GOLAUD (baritone)
ARKEL (bass)
GENEVIEVE (mezzo-soprano)
YNOLD (soprano)
DOCTOR (bass)
SHEPHERD (baritone)
3 POOR MEN (silent)
SERVANTS (silent)

CHORUS
Sailors



ACT I

SCENE I
A forest

Golaud enters.

GOLAUD
I shall never get out of this forest. God knows where that beast has brought me. I thought I had killed it, and here are traces of blood. But now I've lost sight of it. I think I'm lost, too, and my hounds won't find me. I must retrace my steps.
I hear someone crying. Oh! Oh! What's that, there by the water?
A girl crying at the water's edge? She doesn't hear me. I can't see her face.
Why are you crying? Don't be frightened. You've nothing to fear.
Why are you crying here, all alone?

MELISANDE
Don't touch me! Don't touch me!

GOLAUD
Don't be afraid. I won't do you any …
Oh, you're beautiful!

MELISANDE
Don't touch me. Don't touch me,
or I'll throw myself in the water.

GOLAUD
I won't touch you. Look, I'll stay here, by the tree. Don't be afraid.
Has someone hurt you?

MELISANDE
Oh yes, yes, yes.

GOLAUD
Who has hurt you?

MELISANDE
Everyone! Everyone!

GOLAUD
What have they done to you?

MELISANDE
I don't want to say, I can't say.

GOLAUD
Look, don't cry like that. Where are you from?

MELISANDE
I escaped, fled, ran away.

GOLAUD
Yes, but from where did you run away?

MELISANDE
l am lost, lost! Oh! Oh! lost here! I'm not from here, I wasn't born here.

GOLAUD
Where are you from? Where were you born?

MELISANDE
Oh! Oh! Far from here, a long way.

GOLAUD
What's that, shining under the water?

MELISANDE
Where? Oh, it's the crown he gave me. It fell in when I was crying.

GOLAUD
A crown? Who gave you a crown? I'll try to get it back.

MELISANDE
No, no. I don't want it. I don't want it any more.
I would rather die - die now.

GOLAUD
I could easily get it back. The water isn't very deep.

MELISANDE
I don't want it. If you get it back, I'll throw myself in.

GOLAUD
No, no; I'll leave it there. Still, it wouldn't be hard to get it. It looks very beautiful.
Is it long since you ran away?

MELISANDE
Yes, yes.
Who are you?

GOLAUD
l am Prince Golaud, grandson of Arkel, the old king of Allemonde.

MELISANDE
Oh, you already have grey hair!

GOLAUD
Yes, some, here at the temples.

MELISANDE
And your beard too.
Why do you look at me like that?

GOLAUD
I'm looking at your eyes. Do you never shut them?

MELISANDE
Oh yes, I close them at night.

GOLAUD
Why do you look so astonished?

MELISANDE
You are a giant.

GOLAUD
I am a man like any other.

MELISANDE
Why did you come here?

GOLAUD
I don't know myself.
I was hunting in the forest, chasing a wild boar, and I took the wrong path.
You look very young. How old are you?

MELISANDE
I'm beginning to feel cold.

GOLAUD
Will you come with me?

MELISANDE
No, no, I'll stay here.

GOLAUD
You can't stay here all alone. You can't stay all night.
What is your name?

MELISANDE
Mélisande.

GOLAUD
You can't stay here, Mélisande.
Come with me.

MELISANDE
I'll stay here.

GOLAUD
You'll be frightened, all alone.
You don't know what may be here all night, all alone ...
It's impossible, Mélisande. Come, give me your hand.

MELISANDE
Oh, don't touch me.

GOLAUD
Don't cry. I won't touch you. But come with me.
The night will be very dark and cold. Come with me.
MELISANDE
Where are you going?

GOLAUD
I don't know. I'm lost too.


SCENE 2
A room in the castle


GENEVIEVE
This is what he wrote to his brother Pelléas:
"One evening, I found her, in tears, at the edge of a spring, in the forest where I was lost. I don't know her age, or who she is, or where she is from, and dare not ask her, because she must have been terribly shocked and, when asked what happened, she cries suddenly, like a child, and sobs so bitterly that it is frightening.
I married her six months ago, and I still know nothing more about her than on the day we met. Meanwhile, dear Pelléas, whom I love more than a brother, even though we do not have the same father, meanwhile, prepare for my return.
I know my mother will forgive me willingly. But I fear Arkel, despite his kindness. If, however, he consents to accept her as he would his own daughter, the third day after you receive this letter, light a lamp at the top of the tower overlooking the sea. I will see it from the bridge of our ship; if not, I shall travel farther, and never return."
What do you say to that?

ARKEL
I have nothing to say. This may seem strange to us, because we only ever see the reverse side of destiny, the reverse even of our own ...
He always took my advice until now. I thought it would make him happy by sending him to ask for the hand of Princess Ursula. He could not stay single, and ever since his wife's death he was saddened by his solitude: and this marriage was going to bring an end to long wars and old hatreds.
But he did not want it so. Let it be as he wishes: I have never stood in the way of fate; he knows his future better than I. Perhaps nothing that happens is meaningless.

GENEVIEVE
He has always been so prudent, so serious and so dependable. Since his wife's death, he has lived only for his son, little Yniold. He has forgotten everything else.
What shall we do?

ARKEL
Who is coming in?

GENEVIEVE
It's Pelléas. He has been crying.

ARKEL
Is that you, Pelléas? Come a little closer so I can see you in the light.

PELLEAS
Grandfather, I received another letter at the same time as my brother's: it is from my friend Marcellus. He is dying and is asking for me. He says he knows the exact day when death will come. He says I can reach him first, if I want, but there's no time to lose.

ARKEL
You must wait a little longer, though. We don't know what your brother's return has in store for us. And besides, isn't your father upstairs perhaps more ill than your friend? Could you choose between father and friend?

GENEVIEVE
Make sure the lamp is lit this evening, Pelléas.


SCENE 3
In front of the castle


MELISANDE
It's so dark in the gardens.
And what forests, what forests all around the palace.

GENEVIEVE
Yes; they amazed me too when I first came here; they amaze everyone.
There are places where you never see the sun. But you get used to it so
quickly.
It's a long time, a long time … I'v been living here nearly forty years.
Look in the other direction and you will have the light from the sea.

MELISANDE
I hear a noise down below.

GENEVIEVE
Yes; someone's coming up towards us.
Ah, it's Pelléas ... he still seems tired after waiting so long for you.

MELISANDE
He hasn't seen us.

GENEVIEVE
I think he has, but he doesn't know what he should do.
Pelléas, Pelléas! Is that you?

PELLEAS
Yes! I came up from the sea.

GENEVIEVE
So did we, looking for some light.
It's a little brighter here than elsewhere even though the sea is dark.

PELLEAS
We'll have a storm tonight; there have been storms every night for some time, and yet the sea is calm at the moment. You could sail away without realizing it, and never return.

VOICES
Ho! Heave ho! Ho!

MELISANDE
Something is leaving the harbour.

PELLEAS
It must be a big ship; …
… the lights are very high

VOICES
Ho! Heave ho!

PELLEAS
We will see it in a moment…

VOICES
Ho! Heave ho!

PELLEAS
... when it enters that patch of light.

GENEVIEVE
I don't know whether we shall see it …
… there is still some mist on the water.

VOICES
Ho!

PELLEAS
It looks as though the mist is lifting slowly.

MELISANDE
Yes; I can see a small light down there that I couldn't see before.

PELLEAS
That's a lighthouse; there are others that we can't see yet.

MELISANDE
The ship is in the light; it's already quite far off.

PELLEAS
It's moving off under full sail.

MELISANDE
It's the ship that brought me here. It has big sails …

VOICES
Heave ho! Heave ho! Heave ho!

MELISANDE
… I recognize it by its sails.

VOICES
Heave ho!

PELLEAS
It will have a rough sea tonight.

VOICES
Heave ho!

MELISANDE
Why is it going tonight?
You can hardly see it. It could be wrecked!

PELLEAS
Night is falling very … quickly.

VOICES
Ho!

GENEVIEVE
It's time to go in. Pelléas, show Mélisande the way.
I must go and see little Yniold for a moment.

PELLEAS
You can't see anything on the sea.

MELISANDE
I see more lights.

PELLEAS
Those are the other lighthouses.
Do you hear the sea? The wind is rising.
Let's go down this way. Give me your hand.

MELISANDE
But, you see, my hands are full of flowers.

PELLEAS
I'll take your arm; the path is steep and very dark.
I am probably leaving tomorrow.

MELISANDE
Oh! Why are you going away?

ACT II

SCENE 1
A fountain in the park


PELLEAS
You don't know where I have brought you?
I often come and sit here, around noon, when it's too hot in the gardens.
It's stifling today, even in the shade of the trees.

MELISANDE
Oh! How clear the water is!

PELLEAS
It's as cool as winter. This is an old abandoned fountain.
They say it had miraculous powers, and that it opened the eyes of the blind.
They still call it "The Fountain Of The Blind"

MELISANDE
Does it no longer cure the blind?

PELLEAS
Since the king is almost blind, no one comes here any more.

MELISANDE
How alone we are - you can't hear a thing.

PELLEAS
There's always an extraordinary silence. You can almost hear the water sleeping.
Won't you sit on this marble edge? A lime-tree here never lets the sun in.

MELISANDE
I'll lie on the marble. I'd like to see to the bottom of the water.

PELLEAS
Nobody has ever seen it. It may be as deep as the sea.

MELISANDE
If something were shining at the bottom, perhaps you would see it.

PELLEAS
Don't lean over like that!

MELISANDE
I want to touch the water.

PELLEAS
Be careful you don't slip. I'll hold on to your hand.

MELISANDE
No, no, I want to put both hands in. It seems as if my hands are not well today.

PELLEAS
Oh! Oh! Be careful! Be careful!
Mélisande! Mélisande! Oh! your hair!

MELISANDE
I can't, I can't reach low enough.

PELLEAS
Your hair went into the water.

MELISANDE
Yes, it's longer than my arms, longer than I am.

PELLEAS
He also found you by a spring, didn't he?

MELISANDE
Yes.

PELLEAS
What did he say to you?

MELISANDE
Nothing. I no longer remember.

PELLEAS
Was he close to you?

MELISANDE
Yes, he wanted to kiss me.

PELLEAS
And you didn't want him to?

MELISANDE
No.

PELLEAS
Why not?

MELISANDE
Oh! Oh! I saw something move at the bottom of the pool.

PELLEAS
Be careful, be careful! You'll fall!
What are you playing with?

MELISANDE
The ring he gave me.

PELLEAS
Don't play with it like that, over such deep water.

MELISANDE
My hands don't shake.

PELLEAS
How it shines in the sunlight!
Don't throw it so high into the air.

MELISANDE
Oh!

PELLEAS
You've dropped it!

MELISANDE
It's fallen in the water.

PELLEAS
Where is it? Where is it?

MELISANDE
I don't see it going down.

PELLEAS
I think I can see it shining.

MELISANDE
My ring?

PELLEAS
Yes, yes; down there.

MELISANDE
Oh! Oh! It's so far away!
No, no, that's not it, that's not it. It's lost, lost!
There's nothing but a big circle on the water.
What shall we do now?

PELLEAS
There's no need to worry so much about a ring. It's nothing.
Perhaps we shall find it again. Or else, we'll find another.

MELISANDE
No, no, we will not find it again, and we won't find another one, either.
I thought I had caught it. I'd already closed my hands, but it fell despite that.
I threw it too high towards the sun.

PELLEAS
Come, we'll return another day. Come, it's time. They'll be looking for us.
It was striking twelve at the very moment that the ring fell in.

MELISANDE
What shall we tell Golaud if he asks where it is?

PELLEAS
The truth! The truth!


SCENE 2
A room in the castle

Golaud is lying in bed; Mélisande is at the bedside.


GOLAUD
Ah! Ah! It's all right, it will come to nothing.
But I can't explain how it happened.
I was hunting peacefully in the forest. My horse bolted suddenly without reason.
Did he see something unusual? I had just heard midday striking.
On the twelfth stroke, he suddenly took fright and galloped blindly like a mad creature straight into a tree!
I don't know what happened after that.
I fell, and he must have fallen on me; it felt as though the whole forest had fallen across my chest.
I thought my heart had been torn apart. But my heart is in one piece. Apparently, it was nothing.

MELISANDE
Would you like a drink of water?

GOLAUD
No, thank you, I'm not thirsty.

MELISANDE
Would you like a fresh pillow? There's a spot of blood on this one.

GOLAUD
No, don't bother.

MELISANDE
Are you sure? You aren't in too much pain?

GOLAUD
No, no, I've been through worse. Blood and steel are part of my life.

MELISANDE
Shut your eyes and try to sleep. I shall stay here all night.

GOLAUD
No, no, I don't want you to tire yourself like that. I don't need anything, and I'll sleep like a child.
What's the matter, Mélisande? Why are you suddenly crying?

MELISANDE
l am ... l am ill in this place.

GOLAUD
You're ill? What's the matter, what is it, Mélisande?

MELISANDE
I don't know. I feel ill here.
I'd like to talk about it today. My lord, I'm not happy here.

GOLAUD
What's happened, then? Has someone ill-treated you?
Could someone have offended you?

MELISANDE
No, no, no one has done me the least harm. It's not that.

GOLAUD
But you must be hiding something from me.
Tell me the whole truth, Mélisande.
Is it the king? Is it my mother? Is it Pelléas?

MELISANDE
No, no, it's not Pelléas. It isn't anybody.
You couldn't understand. It's something stronger than I am.

GOLAUD
Come; be reasonable, Mélisande. What do you want me to do?
You're not a child any more. Do you want to leave me?

MELISANDE
Oh, no, it's not that. I would like to go away with you.
I can't go on living here. I feel that I might not live much longer.

GOLAUD
But there must still be a reason.
They'll think you're mad. They'll think it's childish nightmares.
Come, is it Pelléas, perhaps? I don't think he often talks to you.

MELISANDE
Oh yes, he talks to me sometimes.
I don't think he likes me; I've seen it in his eyes.
But he speaks to me when we meet.

GOLAUD
You mustn't think badly of him. He has always been like that.
He's a little strange. He'll change, you'll see; he's young.

MELISANDE
But it isn't that, it isn't that.

GOLAUD
What is it, then? Can't you get used to the life we lead here? Is it too sad here?
It's true this castle is very old and gloomy, cold and vast. And all the people here are already old.
And the countryside can seem gloomy too, with all these forests, these old, sunless forests.
But we can brighten all that if we want. Besides, joy, joy isn't something you have every day.
But tell me something; no matter what, I'll do anything you want.

MELISANDE
Yes, it's true ... you never see the sky here. I saw it for the first time this morning.

GOLAUD
So that's what made you cry, my poor Mélisande? That's all it is? You're crying because you don't see the sky?
Come, now, you're too old to cry over such things. Besides, isn't summer almost here? You'll see the sky every day. And then, next year …
Come, give me your hand; give me both your little hands.
Oh, these tiny hands, that I could crush like flowers ...
Wait, where is the ring I gave you?

MELISANDE
The ring?
GOLAUD
Yes, the wedding ring, where is it?

MELISANDE
I think ... I think that it fell off.

GOLAUD
Fell off? Where did it fall? You haven't lost it?

MELISANDE
No; it fell ... it must have fallen ... but I know where it is.

GOLAUD
Where is it?

MELISANDE
You know ... you know the cave by the sea?

GOLAUD
Yes.

MELISANDE
Well, it's there … it must be there.
Yes, yes, I remember. I went there this morning to gather some shells for little Yniold.
There are some pretty ones there. It fell off my finger ... then the sea came in, and I had to leave before I had found it.

GOLAUD
Are you sure it's there?

MELISANDE
Yes, yes, quite sure. I felt it slip off.

GOLAUD
You must go and look for it at once.

MELISANDE
Now? At once? In the dark?

GOLAUD
Now, at once, in the dark. I would rather have lost everything I own than have lost that ring.
You don't know what it is. There will be a high tide tonight. The sea will come and take it before you - hurry!

MELISANDE
I daren't, I daren't go there alone.

GOLAUD
Go there, go there with anyone at all.
But you must go there at once, do you hear me?
Hurry; ask Pelléas to go there with you.

MELISANDE
Pelléas? With Pellas? But Pelléas wouldn't want …

GOLAUD
Pelléas will do anything you ask of him. I know Pelléas better than you do.
Go there, hurry! I won't sleep until I have that ring.

MELISANDE
Oh! Oh! I am unhappy ... l am so unhappy.


SCENE 3
Outside a cave

Pelléas and Mélisande enter.


PELLEAS
Yes, this is the place, we are here.
It's so dark that you can't tell the entrance of the cave from the surrounding darkness. There are no stars on this side. Let's wait until the moon has broken through that big cloud; it will light up the whole cave and we'll be able to go in without danger. There are places where it's dangerous and the path is very narrow, between two pools whose depths have never been tried. I didn't think to bring a torch or a lantern. But I think the light from the sky will be enough.
Have you never been inside this cave?

MELISANDE
No.

PELLEAS
Let's go in. You must be able to describe the place where you lost the ring, if he asks you. It's very large and beautiful, full of blue shadows. When you make even a small light, you'd think the roof was covered with stars, like the sky.
Give me your hand, don't tremble so. There's no danger; we'll stop as soon as we can't see the light from the sea.
Are you afraid of the noise in the cave? Do you hear the sea behind us? It doesn't seem happy tonight.
Ah! Here's the light!

MELISANDE
Ah!

PELLEAS
What is ii?

MELISANDE
There are ... there are …

PELLEAS
Yes, I saw them too.

MELISANDE
Let's go away! Let's go away!

PELLEAS
It's three poor old men, sleeping.
There's a famine in the land. Why have they come here to sleep?

MELISANDE
Let's go away; come ... let's go away!

PELLEAS
Take care, don't talk so loud! Let's not wake them ... they're still fast asleep.
Come.

MELISANDE
Leave me alone. I'd rather walk by myself.

PELLEAS
We'll come back another day.

ACT III

SCENE 1
One of the castle towers
A watchman's path runs below a window of the tower.


MELISANDE
My long hair falls
as far as the base of the tower;
my hair awaits you
the length of the tower,
and all through the day,
and all through the day.
Saint Daniel and Saint Michael,
Saint Michael and Saint Raphael,
I was born on a Sunday,
a Sunday at noon.

PELLEAS
Hallo! Hallo! Ho!

MELISANDE
Who's there?

PELLEAS
Me, myseIf and me!
What are you doing there, at the window,
singing like a bird from another land?

MELISANDE
I'm combing my hair for the night.

PELLEAS
Is that what I see on the wall?
I thought you had a light.

MELISANDE
I opened the window. It's too warm in the tower.
It's a beautiful night.

PELLEAS
There are countless stars; I've never seen as many as there are tonight;
but the moon is still over the sea …
Don't stay in the shadows, Mélisande, lean out a little,
so that I can see your hair all unbraided.

MELISANDE
I look terrible like this.

PELLEAS
Oh! Oh! Mélisande! Oh! You are beautiful. You are beautiful like this!
Lean out, lean out! Let me come closer to you.

MELISANDE
I can't come any nearer to you. I'm leaning as far as I can.

PELLEAS
I can't climb any higher. At least give me your hand tonight, before I leave.
I'm going away tomorrow.

MELISANDE
No, no, no!

PELLEAS
Yes, yes, I'm going, I'm leaving tomorrow.
Give me your hand, your hand, your little hand to touch my lips.

MELISANDE
I won't give you my hand if you're leaving.

PELLEAS
Give, give, give …

MELISANDE
You won't go away?

PELLEAS
I'll wait, I'll wait.

MELISANDE
I see a rose in the shadows.

PELLEAS
Where?
I can only see the branches of the willow that leans over the wall.

MELISANDE
Lower, lower down, in the garden; down there amid the dark green.

PELLEAS
It's not a rose. I'll go and look in a moment,
but give me your hand first, first give me your hand.

MELISANDE
There, there. I can't lean any farther.

PELLEAS
My lips can't reach your hand.

MELISANDE
I can't lean any farther. I'm almost falling.
Oh! Oh! My hair is falling down the side of the tower!

PELLEAS
Oh! Oh! What is it?
Your hair, your hair is falling down to me.
All your hair, Mélisande, all your hair is falling from the tower!
I'm holding it in my hands, against my mouth, in my arms, I'm winding it round my neck.
I shan't open my hands again tonight.

MELISANDE
Let go! Let go! You'll make me fall.

PELLEAS
No, no, no! I've never seen hair like yours, Mélisande.
Look, look, how it comes from so high and yet covers me even to my heart;
it reaches right to my knees!
And it's so soft, as soft as though it fell from heaven.
I can't see the sky through your hair ...
You see, you see? My two hands can't hold it all; it flows over the branches of the willow.
It lives like birds between my fingers, and it loves me, loves me more than you.
MELISANDE
Leave me, leave me. Someone might come.

PELLEAS
No, no, no! I won't release you tonight.
You are my prisoner tonight, all night, all night.

MELISANDE
Pelléas! Pelléas!

PELLEAS
I'm tying it, tying it to the branches of the willow.
You will never go, never leave.
Look, look, how I kiss your hair. I'm no longer sad here, amid your hair.
Can you hear my kisses along your hair? They climb up the length of your hair.
Each single strand must bring them up to you.
You see, you see, I can open my hands. My hands are free but you cannot leave me.

MELISANDE
Oh! Oh! You've hurt me!
What's that, Pelléas? What's that flying round me?

PELLEAS
It's the doves coming from the tower.
I've frightened them; they're flying away.

MELISANDE
They're my doves, Pelléas.
Let's go now, leave me; they wouldn't come back.

PELLEAS
Why shouldn't they return?

MELISANDE
They'll lose themselves in the darkness.
Let me go! Let me raise my head.
I hear footsteps. Let me go!
It's Golaud! I think it's Golaud! He's heard us.

PELLEAS
Wait! Wait! Your hair is wound round the branches.
It got caught up in the darkness. Wait! Wait! It's dark.

GOLAUD
Entering along the path.
What are you doing here?

PELLEAS
What am I doing here? I …

GOLAUD
You are children.
Mélisande, don't lean out of the window like that, you'll fall ...
Don't you realize it's late? It's nearly midnight.
Don't play in the dark like that.
You are children ... what children! ... what children!

He goes out with Pélleas.


SCENE 2
The castle vaults


GOLAUD
Be careful; this way, this way.
Have you never been down into these vaults?

PELLEAS
Yes, once; some time ago; but it was long ago.

GOLAUD
Well, here's the stagnant pool I mentioned.
Do you smell the scent of death which comes from it?
Let's go to the edge of that overhanging rock and lean over a little; the odour will strike you full in the face.
Lean over; don't be afraid, I'll hold you.
Give me - no, no, not your hand, it could slip - your arm.
Do you see the chasm, Pelléas, Pelléas?

PELLEAS
Yes, I think I can see to the bottom of it.
Is the light flickering? You …

GOLAUD
Yes, it's the lantern.
See, I was swinging it to illuminate the walls.
PELLEAS
I can't breathe here. Let's go out.

GOLAUD
Yes, let's go out.

They go silently.


SCENE 3
A terrace at the entrance to the vaults


PELLEAS
Ah! At last I can breathe!
I thought, for a moment, that I would be ill in those huge caves; I was on the point of passing out.
The air is moist and heavy like a dew of lead down there, with thick shadows like a poisoned paste.
And now, all the air from all over the sea!
There's afresh wind, see, fresh as a leaf that has just opened, with its tiny green blades.
There! They've just watered the flowers along the terrace
and the perfume of the greenery and the sprinkled roses reaches up to here.
It must be nearly midday; they're already in the shade of the tower.
It is midday, I can hear the clocks chiming and the children are going down to the beach to swim.
Look, there's our mother and Mélisande by a window in the tower.

GOLAUD
Yes, they're sheltering on the shady side.
On the subject of Mélisande, I heard what went on and what was said last night.
I know quite well that these are children's games; but it mustn't happen again.
She's very delicate, and we must look after her,
all the more since she may soon become a mother,
and the slightest upset could make her ill.
It's not the first time I've noticed that there could be something going on between you …
You are older than she, and it's enough for me to have spoken to you …
Avoid her as much as possible; but without making a show of it, of course, without making a show of it.


SCENE 4
In front of the castle
Golaud and the child Yniold enter.


GOLAUD
Come, let's sit here, Yniold; come and sit on my knee;
from here we can see anything that happens in the forest.
I don't seem to have seen you at all for some time.
You're neglecting me too; you're always with Mummy.
Look, we're sitting right under Mummy's window.
Perhaps she's saying her evening prayers at this moment ...
But tell me, Yniold, she's often with your Uncle Pelléas, isn't she?

YNIOLD
Yes, yes, always, Daddy; when you're not there.

GOLAUD
Ah! ... Wait, someone's going through the garden carrying a lantern.
But I've been told they didn't like each other.
It seems that they often quarrel ... don't they? Is that true?

YNIOLD
Yes, yes, it's true.

GOLAUD
Yes? Aha!
But what do they quarrel about?

YNIOLD
About the door.

GOLAUD
What! About the door! What are you saying?

YNIOLD
Because it can't be opened.

GOLAUD
Who doesn't want it opened? Look, why do they quarrel?

YNIOLD
I don't know, Daddy, about the light.

GOLAUD
I'm not talking about the light; I'm talking to you about the door.
Don't put your fingers in your mouth. Look here.

YNIOLD
Daddy, Daddy! I won't do it again.

GOLAUD
Here, why are you crying now? What's the matter?

YNIOLD
Oh! Oh! Daddy! You hurt me!

GOLAUD
Hurt you? Where have I hurt you?
I didn't mean to.

YNIOLD
Here, here, on my poor arm.

GOLAUD
I didn't mean to; there, there, don't cry.
I'll give you something tomorrow.

YNIOLD
What, Daddy?

GOLAUD
A quiver and some arrows.
But tell me what you know about the door.

YNIOLD
Big arrows?

GOLAUD
Yes, great big arrows.
But why don't they want the door open?
Come along, answer me at once!
No, no, don't start crying, I'm not cross.
What do they talk about when they're together?

YNIOLD
Pelléas and Mummy?

GOLAUD
Yes; what do they talk about?

YNIOLD
Me; always about me.

GOLAUD
And what do they say about you?

YNIOLD
They say that I'll be very big.

GOLAUD
Ah! Misery!
I am here like a blind man looking for treasure at the bottom of the ocean!
Here I am, like a newborn babe lost in the forest, and you ...
But look, Yniold, I was forgetting myself; we're going to have a serious little talk.
Don't Pelléas and Mummy ever talk about me when I'm not there?

YNIOLD
Oh yes, Daddy.

GOLAUD
Ah! And what do they say about me?

YNIOLD
They say I'll be as big as you.

GOLAUD
Are you always near them?

YNIOLD
Yes, yes, always, Daddy.

GOLAUD
They never tell you to go and play outside?

YNIOLD
No, Daddy, they're afraid when I'm not there.

GOLAUD
Afraid? How do you know they're afraid?

YNIOLD
They're always crying in the dark.

GOLAUD
Ah ha!

YNIOLD
It makes me cry too …

GOLAUD
Yes, yes!

YNIOLD
She's pale, Daddy.

GOLAUD
Ah! Ah! Patience, God give me patience!

YNIOLD
What, Daddy?

GOLAUD
Nothing, nothing, my child.
I saw a wolf go by in the forest.
They kiss sometimes, don't they?

YNIOLD
Kiss, Daddy? No, no.
Oh yes, Daddy, yes, they did once, when it was raining.

GOLAUD
They kissed? But how, how did they kiss?

YNIOLD
Like this Daddy, like this.
Ha ha! Your beard, Daddy! It tickles, tickles!
It's getting grey Daddy, and your hair, too, all grey, all grey.
The window under which they are seated lights up, the light falling on them.
Ah! Ah! Mummy has lit her lamp. It's light, Daddy, it's light.

GOLAUD
Yes, it's beginning to get light.

YNIOLD
Let's go there too, Daddy; let's go there.

GOLAUD
Where do you want to go?

YNIOLD
Where it's light, Daddy.

GOLAUD
No, no, child; let's stay here a little longer in the shadows.
We don't know yet, not yet. I think Pelléas is mad.

YNIOLD
No, Daddy, he's not mad, he's very good.

GOLAUD
Do you want to see Mummy?

YNIOLD
Yes, yes, I'd like to!

GOLAUD
Don't make a noise; I'm going to lift you up to the window.
It's too high for me, even though I'm so tall.
Don't make the least noise: Mummy would be terribly frightened.
Can you see her? Is she in her room?

YNIOLD
Yes. Oh, it's bright!

GOLAUD
Is she alone?

YNIOLD
Yes ... No, no.
My Uncle Pelléas is there too.
GOLAUD
He …

YNIOLD
Ow! Daddy, you hurt me!

GOLAUD
It's nothing; be quiet; I won't do it again; keep watching, Yniold!
I caught my foot. Speak more softly. What are they doing?

YNIOLD
Nothing , Daddy.

GOLAUD
Are they close to one another? Are they talking?

YNIOLD
No, Daddy, they're not saying anything.

GOLAUD
But what are they doing?

YNIOLD
They're looking at the light.

GOLAUD
Both of them?

YNIOLD
Yes, Daddy.

GOLAUD
They're saying nothing?

YNIOLD
No, Daddy; they don't shut their eyes.

GOLAUD
They're not moving closer to each other?

YNIOLD
No, Daddy, they never shut their eyes …
I'm very frightened!

GOLAUD
What are you frightened of?
Go on looking!

YNIOLD
Daddy, let me down!

GOLAUD
Watch!

YNIOLD
Oh! I'll cry, Daddy!
Let me down! Let me down!

GOLAUD
Come, then!

ACT IV

SCENE 1
A room in the castle



PELLEAS
Where are you going?
I must talk to you this evening. Will I see you?

MELISANDE
Yes.

PELLEAS
I've just come from my father's room.
He's better. The doctor told us he'll recover. He knew me.
He took my hand, and said to me, in that strange manner he's had ever since he's been ill:
"Is that you, Pelléas? Why, I'd never noticed it before, but you have that sad yet serene look of those who haven't long to live. You must travel; you must travel.''
It's strange, I'm going to obey him.
My mother was listening to this and cried for joy.
Haven't you felt it? The whole house seems to be reviving.
You can hear people breathing and walking. Listen; I can hear someone talking behind the door.
Quick, tell me quickly, where I will see you?

MELISANDE
Where would you like?

PELLEAS
In the park, by The Fountain Of The Blind.
Will you? Will you come?

MELISANDE
Yes.

PELLEAS
It will be the last evening. I'm going to take a journey, as my father said.
You will never see me again.

MELISANDE
Don't say that, Pelléas ...
I shall always see you, I will always look for you.

PELLEAS
You'll look in vain. I'll be so far away that you'll never see me.

MELISANDE
What's happened, Pelléas? I don't understand what you're saying.

PELLEAS
Go; let's stay apart.
I hear people talking behind the door.

He goes out.


SCENE 2

ARKEL
Entering
Now that Pelléas' father is recovering, and illness, that old servant of death, has left the castle, a little joy and sunshine will at last return to the house ... It's time enough! Ever since your arrival, all we've done is to whisper in closed rooms. And in truth, I've been sorry for you, Mélisande. I watched you and saw you there, unaware of it perhaps, but with that strange, puzzled look of someone constantly awaiting disaster, in the sunshine, in a beautiful garden.
I can't explain, but I was sad to see you thus, for you are too young and beautiful to live almost day and night under the shadow of death. But now all that is going to change. At my age, and this is probably the most sure fruit of my life, I've gained a sort of faith in the fidelity of events, and I have always seen how the young and beautiful create young, beautiful and happy events around them. So now it is you who are going to open the door upon the new era that I foresee.
Come over here; why do you stand over there without answering or raising your eyes? I have only ever kissed you once, the day you arrived; yet old men need, now and then, to place their lips against a woman's forehead or a child's cheek, to believe again in the freshness of life, and, for a moment, drive away the threat of death. Are you afraid of my old lips? How sorry I've been for you these last months …

MELISANDE
I wasn't unhappy, Grandfather.

ARKEL
Let me look at you, close up, for a moment. One greatly needs beauty when death is so close.

GOLAUD
Coming in
Pelléas leaves this evening.

ARKEL
You have blood on your forehead. What have you done?

GOLAUD
Nothing, nothing ... I went through a thorny hedge.

MELISANDE
Put your head down a little, my lord … I'll wipe your forehead.

GOLAUD
I don't want you to touch me, d'you hear? Go! I'm not speaking to you.
Where is my sword? I came to look for my sword.

MELISANDE
Here, on the prayer-stool.

GOLAUD
Brine it here.
to Arkel
They've just found a peasant, dead from starvation, on the shore.
You might say they're all trying to die under our very eyes.
to Mélisande
Well, where's my sword? Why do you tremble like that?
I'm not going to kill you. I simply wanted to look at the blade. I don't put a sword to such use.
Why do you look at me as though I were a beggar? I haven't come to you begging for alms.
Do you hope to see something in my eyes without my seeing something in yours?
Do you think I know something? Look at those large eyes … you'd think they are proud of their richness.

ARKEL
I see nothing in them but great innocence.

GOLAUD
Great innocence! They are greater than innocence!
They are purer than the eyes of a lamb! They could give God lessons in innocence!
Great innocence! More than innocence!
You could say that heavenly angels were forever celebrating a christening there.
I know these eyes. I've seen them at work. Shut them!
Shut them, or I'll shut them for a long time.
Don't put your hand to your throat like that; I am saying very simple things. I have no secret thoughts. If I had, why wouldn't I speak?
Ah! Ah! Don't try to get away! Stay here! Give me your hand!
Ah, your hands are too warm ... Away! Your flesh disgusts me!
Go! There's no way of escaping now.
Seizing her by the hair.
You're going to follow me on your knees! On your knees in front of me!
Ah! Ah! Your long hair is good for something at last.
To the right, and then the left! To the left and then the right!
Absalom! Absalom! Forward! Back! Down to the ground, the ground...
You see, you see, I'm already laughing like an old man ... Ha, ha, ha!

ARKEL
Golaud!

GOLAUD
You will do as you like, you see! It means nothing to me.
l am too old; and besides, I'm not a spy. I'll wait for the chance; and then ...
Oh, then! Simply because it's accepted ... simply because it's customary.

He goes out.

ARKEL
What's the matter with him? Is he drunk?

MELISANDE
No, no, but he doesn't love me any more ... l am not happy …

ARKEL
If I were God, I would have pity on the hearts of men.


SCENE 3
A fountain in the park
Yniold is trying to lift a boulder.


YNIOLD
Oh! This stone is heavy … It's heavier than me ... It's heavier than everyone ... It's heavier than everything …
I can see my gold ball between the rocks and this nasty stone, and I can't reach it. My little arm isn't long enough.
And this stone doesn't want to be lifted. You'd think it had roots into the ground …
Oh! Oh! I can hear the sheep crying. There! The sun's gone in ...
The little sheep are coming; here they come. There are lots of them! Lots! They're afraid of the dark.
They're huddling together, rubbing against each other. They cry and they run fast.
There are some who want to run to the right. They'd all like to go to the right. They can't!
The shepherd is throwing earth at them. Ah! Ah! They are going to pass by here.
I'll see them close to. What a lot there are! Now they are all quiet …
Shepherd, why don't they talk any more?

SHEPHERD
Because this isn't the way to the stable.
YNIOLD
Where are they going? Shepherd? Shepherd? Where are they going?
He doesn't hear me. They're too far away already. They don't make any more noises.
It's not the way to the stable. Where will they sleep tonight?
Oh! Oh! It's too dark … I'm going to tell somebody.

He goes off. Pelléas enters.


SCENE 4

PELLEAS
It's the last night ... the last night. Everything must end.
I've played like a child with something I didn't realize. I have been playing, in a dream, with the strings of fate.
Who suddenly brought me to my senses? I shall run away, crying with joy and sadness, like a blind man escaping from a burning house. I'm going to tell her that I'm escaping …
It's late; she's not coming. I'd do better to leave without seeing her again.
I must look carefully at her this time ... there are things I no longer remember ... it seems as though I haven't seen her for a hundred years and I've still not looked her full in the eyes.
There'll be nothing left for me if I go away like this ...
And all those memories ... It's as I were trying to hold water in a muslin bag.
I must see her for one last look into the depths of her heart ... I must tell her all the things I've never said.

MELISANDE
Entering
Pelléas!

PELLEAS
Mélisande! Is it you, Mélisande?

MELISANDE
Yes.

PELLEAS
Come here, don't stay on the edge of the moonlight, come here, we have so many things to say to each other...
Come here into the shadow of the lime-tree.

MELISANDE
Let me stay in the light.

PELLEAS
They might see us from the windows of the tower.
Come here; here, we have nothing to fear.
Be careful, they might see us!

MELISANDE
I want to be seen.

PELLEAS
What's the matter? Did you get out without being seen?

MELISANDE
Yes, your brother was asleep.

PELLEAS
It's late, in an hour they'll shut the gates. We must be careful.
Why are you so late?

MELISANDE
Your brother had a bad dream. Then my dress got caught on nails in the door.
See, it's torn. I lost all that time and I ran …

PELLEAS
My poor Mélisande! I'm almost afraid to touch you.
You're out of breath, like a hunted bird. Did you do all that for me?
I can hear your heart beating as though it were my own. Come here, closer to me.

MELISANDE
Why do you laugh?

PELLEAS
I'm not laughing; or rather, I'm laughing for joy without realizing it …
I should really be crying.

MELISANDE
We came here long ago. I remember …

PELLEAS
Yes ... many long months ago. I didn't know, then.
Do you know why I asked you to come this evening?

MELISANDE
No.

PELLEAS
It's probably the last time I'll see you. I must go away forever.

MELISANDE
Why do you always say you're going away?

PELLEAS
Must I tell you what you know already!
Don't you know what I'm going to say?

MELISANDE
No, no. I know nothing.

PELLEAS
You don't know why I must leave?
You don't realize that it's because I love you.

MELISANDE
I love you too.

PELLEAS
Oh! What did you say Mélisande! I hardly heard it. The ice has been broken with redhot irons!
You say it in a voice which comes from the ends of the earth!
I hardly heard you ... You love me? You love me too?
How long have you loved me?

MELISANDE
Always ... since I first saw you.

PELLEAS
Your voice sounds as if it had crossed a Spring sea! I have never heard it until now.
It's as if rain has fallen on my heart. You said it so openly!
Like an angel being questioned …
I can't believe it, Mélisande. Why would you love me? Why do you love me? Do you speak truly?
You're not deceiving me? It isn't a little lie to make me smile?

MELISANDE
No, I never lie, except to your brother.

PELLEAS
Oh! How you said that! Your voice! Your voice! It's fresher and purer than water!
It's like pure water on my lips ... like pure water upon my hands ...
Give, give me your hands. Oh! Your hands are so tiny!
I didn't realize you were so beautiful! I've never seen anything so lovely before ...
I was restless, searching everywhere in the house, everywhere around the countryside, and could not find beauty ...
And now that I've found you, I've found it ... I don't believe there can be a more beautiful woman in the world!
Where are you? I can't hear you breathing.

MELISANDE
Because I am looking at you.

PELLEAS
Why do you look at me so sadly? We are in the shadows. It's too dark beneath this tree. Come into the light.
We can't see how happy we are. Come, come; there's so little time left to us.

MELISANDE
No, no, let's stay here … I'm closer to you in the darkness.

PELLEAS
Where are your eyes? You won't run away from me?
You aren't thinking of me at this very moment.

MELISANDE
Yes, I only think of you.

PELLEAS
You were looking somewhere else.

MELISANDE
I was seeing you somewhere else.

PELLEAS
You're uneasy ... what is it? You don't seem happy.

MELISANDE
Yes, yes, I'm happy, but I'm sad as well.

PELLEAS
What's that noise? They're shutting the gates.

MELISANDE
Yes, they've shut them.

PELLEAS
We'll not be able to get in again! Do you hear the bolts?
Listen, listen … the heavy chains! It's too late, too late!

MELISANDE
All the better!

PELLEAS
You? Well, that's it. . . It's no longer what we might want!
All is lost, all is saved! All is saved this night!
Come, come, my heart is beating madly right up into my throat.
They clasp each other.
Listen, my heart almost chokes me ... Come! ... Ah! It's so beautiful in he dark!

MELISANDE
There's someone behind us …

PELLEAS
I can't see anyone.

MELISANDE
I heard a noise.

PELLEAS
I only hear your heart in the darkness.

MELISANDE
I heard the rustle of dead leaves.

PELLEAS
The wind has suddenly dropped. It stilled while we kissed.

MELISANDE
How big our shadows are this evening!

PELLEAS
They are entwined as far as the end of the garden!
Ah! See how they kiss each other far away from us! Look! Look!

MELISANDE
Ah! He is behind a tree!

PELLEAS
Who?

MELISANDE
Golaud!

PELLEAS
Golaud! Where? I can't see anything.

MELISANDE
There ... at the end of our shadows.

PELLEAS
Yes, yes; I saw him ... we mustn't turn suddenly.

MELISANDE
He has his sword.

PELLEAS
I don't have mine.

MELISANDE
He saw us kiss.

PELLEAS
He doesn't know we've seen him. Don't move; don't turn your head.
He would run forward. He's watching us. He's still standing quite still.
Go, go quickly, this way. I'll wait for him and stop him.

MELISANDE
No!

PELLEAS
Go!

MELISANDE
No!

PELLEAS
He's seen eveything. He'll kill us!

MELISANDE
All the better!

PELLEAS
He's coming!

MELISANDE
All the better!

PELLEAS
Your mouth! Your mouth!

MELISANDE
Yes! Yes! Yes!

PELLEAS
Oh! Oh! All the stars are falling!

MELISANDE
On me, too! On me, too!

PELLEAS
Again! Again! Give me …

MELISANDE
Everything! ... Everything, everything!

PELLEAS
Give, give …

Golaud runs forward and strikes down Pelléas with his sword.

MELISANDE
Oh! Oh! I haven't the courage! I haven't the courage! Ah!

ACT V

A room in the castle
Arkel, Golaud and the Doctor are standing in a corner.
Mélisande lies in bed.


DOCTOR
She couldn't die from this little wound, it wouldn't kill a bird.
So it isn't you who have killed her, my lord; don't grieve so.
Besides, nobody has said that we won't save her.

ARKEL
No, no, it seems to me that u'e are keeping too quiet, despite ourselves, in this room, which isn't a good sign.
See how she sleeps ... slowly, sslowly. It's as though her soul were cold for ever.

GOLAUD
I killed without reason! Isn't it enough to make stones weep!
They kissed each other like little children ... they were brother and sister.
And I, I straightaway … ! I did it in spite of myself, you understand ...
I did it in spite of myself.

DOCTOR
Careful; I think she is waking.

MELISANDE
Open the window, open the window.

ARKEL
Do you want me to open this one, Mélisande?

MELISANDE
No, no, the big wndow … so that I can see.

ARKEL
Isn't the air from the sea too cold this evening?

DOCTOR
Do it, do it.

MELISANDE
Thank you. Is the sun setting?

ARKEL
Yes; it's setting over the sea; it's late.
How do you feel, Mélisande?

MELISANDE
Well, weIl. Why do you ask that? I've never felt better.
Yet it seems to me that I know about something.

ARKEL
What are you saying? I don't understand you

MELISANDE
I don't understand everything I'm saying either, you see.
I don't know what I'm saying. I don't know what I know.
I'm no longer able to say what I want to.

ARKEL
Yes, but you can!
I'm so happy to hear you talking like this; you were slightly delirious these past few days, and we didn't understand you. But now all that's behind us.

MELISANDE
I don't know. Are you alone in the room, Grandfather?

ARKEL
No, the doctor who's been looking after you is still here.

MELISANDE
Ah!

ARKEL
And then, there's someone else.

MELISANDE
Who is it?

ARKEL
It's … don't be afraid.
Rest assured he doesn't wish you any harm ...
if you are afraid, he'll go ... he's very unhappy.

MELISANDE
Who is it?

ARKEL
It's ... It's your husband. It's Golaud.

MELISANDE
Golaud is here? Why doesn't he come near me?

GOLAUD
Mélisande ... Mélisande …

MELISANDE
Is that you, Golaud? I hardly recognized you. It's the evening sun in my eyes.
Why do you look at the walls? You have got thinner, and older.
Is it long since we last saw each other?

GOLAUD
Will you go out for a while, my friends? I'll leave the door wide open - just for a while.
I want to tell her something; if I don't, I would not die in peace.
Will you? You can come back straight away. Don't refuse me this … I'm a miserable creature.
Arkel and the Doctor leave the room.
Mélisande, are you sorry for me as I am for you?
Mélisande, do you forgive me, Mélisande?

MELISANDE
Yes, yes, I forgive you ... what is there to forgive?

GOLAUD
I've done you so much harm, Mélisande. I can't tell you the harm I've done.
But I can see it all, see it clearly now ... from the first day.
And it's all my fault, everything that has happened, everything that is going to happen.
If I could only tell you, you would see things as I see them. I see everything, I understand everything!
But I loved you so much. And now, someone is going to die. And I want to know, I want to ask you ...
You wouldn't hold it against me? You must tell the truth to someone who is going to die.
He must learn the truth, or he couldn't sleep ... Swear you'll tell me the truth?

MELISANDE
Yes.

GOLAUD
Did you love Pelléas?

MELISANDE
Why yes, I loved him. Where is he?

GOLAUD
You don't realize? You don't want to understand me?
It seems ... it seems to me ... Well, it's this. I'm asking you if your love for him was a forbidden love.
Were you ... were you both guilty? Say, tell me, yes, yes.

MELISANDE
No, no, we weren't guilty. Why do you ask that?

GOLAUD
Mélisande! For the love of God, tell me the truth!

MELISANDE
Why haven't I told you the truth?

GOLAUD
Don't go on lying like this, on the brink of death!

MELISANDE
Who is going to die? Am I?

GOLAUD
You, you and I - I too - after you! And we must have the truth.
We must have the truth at the end, do you see?
Tell me everything! Tell me everything! I forgive you everything!

MELISANDE
Why am I going to die? I didn't know it.

GOLAUD
You know now ... It's high time!
Quick! Quick! The truth! The truth!

MELISANDE
The truth ... the truth …

GOLAUD
Where are you, Mélisande? Where are you?
It's not natural! Mélisande! Where are you?
Arkel and the Doctor return.
Yes, yes, you can come in.
I don't know anything, it's useless ... She's already too far gone ...
I will never know! I'm going to die here like a blind man!

ARKEL
What have you done? You're going to kill her.

GOLAUD
I've already killed her.

ARKEL
Mélisande ...

MELISANDE
Is that you, Grandfather?
ARKEL
Yes, my child... what do you want me to do?

MELISANDE
Is it true that winter is beginning?

ARKEL
Why do you ask that?

MELISANDE
Because it's cold and there are no more leaves …

ARKEL
Are you cold? Would you like the windows shut?

MELISANDE
No, … not until the sun has sunk into the sea.
It goes down slowly: so winter is starting?

ARKEL
You don't like winter?

MELISANDE
Oh no! I'm frightened of the cold! I'm so afraid when it's really cold.

ARKEL
Do you feel better?

MELISANDE
Yes, yes, I'm not worried any more.

ARKEL
Do you want to see your child?

MELISANDE
What child?

ARKEL
Your child. Your little daughter.

MELISANDE
Where is she?

ARKEL
Here.

MELISANDE
It's strange. I can't lift my arms to take her.

ARKEL
It's because you're still very weak.
I'll hold her up for you; look.

MELISANDE
She doesn't laugh. She is tiny.
She is going to cry too. I'm sorry for her.

The serving women of the castle enter the room and stand round the walls, waiting silently.

GOLAUD
What's happening? What are all these women doing here?

DOCTOR
They're the serving-women.

ARKEL
Who called them?

DOCTOR
Not I.

GOLAUD
What are you doing here? No one sent for you.
What are you doing here? What is it, then? Answer me!

ARKEL
Don't speak too loudly.
She's going to sleep; she's shut her eyes.

GOLAUD
It's not ... ?

DOCTOR
No, no; look, she's breathing.

ARKEL
Her eyes are filled with tears. Now it is her soul that weeps.
Why does she reach forward with her arms like that? What does she want?

DOCTOR
The child, no doubt. It's a mother's struggle against -

GOLAUD
Now? Now? You must say it. Tell me! Tell me!

DOCTOR
Perhaps.

GOLAUD
At once? Oh! Oh! I must tell her ...
Mélisande! Mélisande!
Leave me alone! Leave me alone with her!

ARKEL
No, no, don't go near her. Don't trouble her.
Say nothing more. You don't know what the soul is.

GOLAUD
It wasn't my fault! It wasn't my fault!

ARKEL
Careful ... careful. We must speak softly now. We mustn't worry her further.
The human soul is a v"ry silent thing. It likes to take its leave of us alone.
It suffers so timidly. But the pity of it, Golaud, the sadness of everything one sees.
Oh! Oh!
All the servants suddenly fall to their knees, at the back of the room.
What is it?

DOCTOR
They are right.

ARKEL
I saw nothing. Are you sure?

DOCTOR
Yes, yes.

ARKEL
I heard nothing. So quickly, so quickly. She's gone without a word.
Don't stay here, Golaud. She needs silence now. Come, come. It's terrible, but it's not your fault.
She was such a quiet little thing, so timid and silent. She was a poor, mysterious little person like anyone.
She lies there like the elder sister to her own child. Come. The child mustn't stay here in this room.
It must live, now, in her place. It's the poor little one's turn.